Free Sample Business Plan - Operation Section of The Internet Company | Business Plan Hut

 

business plan operations section example

Since the business training information is still under construction, there is no need for the company to occupy office space prior to February of X. Arrangements such as specific location, corporate address, telephone number, fax number, etc will be made in late January. This concludes the operations section of the business plan. Dec 24,  · When writing the business plan, the operations plan section describes the physical necessities of your business's operation, such as your business's physical location, facilities, and tiptgopsa.gqing on what kind of business you'll be operating, it may also include information about inventory requirements, suppliers, and a description of the manufacturing process. In the lineup of key business capabilities in your business plan, the term operations describes the processes and resources that you use to produce the highest quality products or services as efficiently as possible. Business operations typically include four key areas: Location: Where you do business — physically and online Equipment: The tools you need [ ].


Writing a Business Plan Operations Plan Section - Sample Template | ProfitableVenture


In this edited excerpt, the authors discuss what type of information you should include in the operations section of your business plan. Operations is concerned with how you buy, build and prepare your product or service for sale. That covers a lot of ground, including sourcing raw materials, hiring labor, acquiring facilities and equipment, and shipping the finished goods. The basic rule for your operations section is to cover just the major areas—labor, materials, business plan operations section example, facilities, equipment and processes—and provide the major details—things that are critical to operations or that give you competitive advantage.

The simplest way to treat operations is to think of it as a linear process that can be broken down into a sequence of tasks. Once the initial task listing is complete, turn your attention to who's needed to do which tasks.

Keep this very simple and concentrate on major tasks such as producing a product or delivering a service. Retail and service firms have different operations requirements from manufacturers. Companies that maintain or repair things, sell consulting or provide health care or other services generally have higher labor content and lower investments in plants and equipment.

But most people already understand the basics of processes such as buying and reselling merchandise or giving haircuts or preparing tax returns. For service and retail firms, people are the main engines of production. The cost of providing a service is largely driven by the cost of the labor it entails. A service-firm plan, then, has to devote considerable attention to staffing. Operations plans for retailers also devote considerable attention to sourcing desirable products.

They may describe the background and accomplishments of key buyers. They may detail long-term supply agreements with manufacturers of in-demand branded merchandise, business plan operations section example. The lead actor in manufacturing is the process of production, and the better your production process, the better a manufacturer you'll be.

Business plan readers look for strong systems in place to make sure that personnel and materials are appropriately abundant.

In your operations section, don't go into too much detail -- stick to the important processes, those essential to your production or that give you a special competitive advantage and be sure you show that you have adequate, reliable supply sources for the materials you need to build your products.

Estimate your needs for materials and describe the agreements with business plan operations section example, including their length and terms that you have arranged to fulfill those needs.

You may also give the backgrounds of your major suppliers and show that you have backup sources available should problems develop. You'll also need to include information on how you'll ensure a reliable supply of adequately trained people to run your processes. Then show that you can reasonably expect to be able to hire what you need. Look at local labor pools, unemployment rates and wage levels using information from chambers of commerce or similar entities.

Manufacturing a product naturally requires equipment. Naturally, investors are very interested in your plans for purchasing equipment. Make a list of every sizable piece of equipment you anticipate needing.

Include a description of its features, its functions, and, of course, its cost. Be ready to defend the need to own the more expensive items. Bankers and other investors are loath to plunk down money for capital equipment that can be resold only for far less than its purchase price. Also consider leasing what you need if you're starting out. Decide how much space you require in square feet. Now consider the location.

You may need to be close to a labor force and materials suppliers. Transportation needs, such as proximity to rail, interstate highways, or airports, can also be important. Next determine whether there's any specific layout that you need. To figure the cost of facilities, first decide whether you'll lease or buy space and what your rent or mortgage payments will be.

Finally, take a look at operating costs. Utilities including phone, electric, gas, water, and trash pickup are concerns; also consider such costs as your computer connections, possibly satellite connections, as well as maintenance and general upkeep.

You should also consider your need to acquire or protect such valuable operations assets as proprietary processes and patented technologies. For many businesses, intellectual property is more valuable than their sizable accumulations of plants and equipment. Image credit: Shutterstock. The Staff of Business plan operations section example Media, business plan operations section example, Inc. Entrepreneur Staff. January 4, 6 min read. More from Entrepreneur.

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First Steps: Writing the Operations Section of Your Business Plan

 

business plan operations section example

 

Jan 04,  · This quick guide offers tips that will help you create the operations section for your business plan. First Steps: Writing the Operations Section of Your Business Plan essential to any Author: The Staff of Entrepreneur Media, Inc. In the lineup of key business capabilities in your business plan, the term operations describes the processes and resources that you use to produce the highest quality products or services as efficiently as possible. Business operations typically include four key areas: Location: Where you do business — physically and online Equipment: The tools you need [ ]. Dec 24,  · When writing the business plan, the operations plan section describes the physical necessities of your business's operation, such as your business's physical location, facilities, and tiptgopsa.gqing on what kind of business you'll be operating, it may also include information about inventory requirements, suppliers, and a description of the manufacturing process.